Charlestown harbour Cornwall

ABOUT CORNWALL

Things to do in Cornwall and a look at the history of The Cornwall Hotel

Things to do in Cornwall

Discover what's nearby and start planning your visit

Cornwall has so much to offer visitors

Cornwall has so much to offer visitors.  It's well-known for its stunning coastline but it's also full of hidden treasures just waiting to be discovered.

There are several places to visit near St. Austell; gorgeous gardens (none better than The Lost Gardens of Heligan or The Eden Project, both located close to us at The Cornwall), plenty of galleries and museums, and plenty of memorable activities like surfing, fishing, boat trips, cycling and walking along sections of the outstanding South West Coast Path.

History and heritage abound in Cornwall, with a plethora of historic houses, castles, museums and World Heritage Sites. And of course there are iconic places to visit like St Michael's Mount, the Minack Theatre, Tate St Ives, Land's End and Tintagel Castle.

In Cornwall there are plenty of events and attractions to enjoy, whether it is food and drink, music, literature, walking, theatre and art, plus a handful of very "Cornish" festivals and events giving you an insight into the local culture.

Along the coastline you'll find over 300 sandy beaches to explore, many of them dog-friendly (especially outside of the summer months), and offering some of the best surfing in the UK.

Mevagissey Harbour Cornwall

St Austell

The Cornwall Hotel, Lodges & Spa are situated just to the south of St Austell, on the road to the harbour village of Mevagissey.  This area of the Cornish south coast features many wooded hills that drop down to secluded coves and inlets.  Nearby there are traditional enchanting fishing villages, woodland walks, stunning gardens and golden beaches.

The coastline of St Austell Bay curves around the Douth coast of Cornwall and is a haven for watersports enthusiasts. Mevagissey is a working fishing harbour, Charlestown is an historic harbour with granite quays and tall ships, Gorran Haven and Portmellon are quaint coves and Pentewan or Porthpean are great family beaches.

The Cornwall Hotel & Estate lawns

The Cornwall Hotel

The Estate on which The Cornwall Hotel is located dates back to the Anglo Saxon period - a time of conflict, the legend of King Arthur and Viking invasions. Tin miners working on the estate in the early 1700s discovered a hoard of gold, buried in the grounds centuries earlier to conceal it from medieval invaders - some say they discovered only half the treasure. The other half still lies buried somewhere on The Cornwall Estate......

The impressive Grade II Listed manor house at the heart of today's estate was constructed in the early 19th Century by a local banker, and, after years of neglect, this was later refurbished and converted into contemporary accommodation - the stunning Cornwall Hotel, lodges and leisure facilities opened in 2010.

While the accommodation now includes a 65-bedroom hotel, award-winning infinity pool, indulgent spa and restaurant, The Cornwall maintains much of its historical charm. The Victorian parkland, ancient walled garden and ornamental pond enhance the beautiful landscape, while the mud kitchen and children's play area are a hit with parents and younger visitors.

Pick up a copy of Gwendolyn's Treasure Trail from Reception, follow the woodland trail through the flora and fauna and solve the clues to learn more about the beautiful Cornwall Estate.

The Lost Gardens of Heligan

This once great estate had been abandoned since World War I, becoming overgrown and lost to the world. Rediscovered in the late 20th Century when a door was uncovered from beneath the brambles, a dedicated team of enthusiasts worked tirelessly to turn the Lost Gardens of Heligan into one of the country's best gardens. Explore over 200 acres of rare plants, wildlife and winding paths, wander through the vegetable garden, discover the jungle rope bridge and run wild in the woodland.

Eden Project in Cornwall

The Eden Project

Home to the largest rainforest in captivity, the Eden Project is a must-see destination, whether you're green-fingered or don't know your trowel from your towel. Marvel at the thousands of rare plants, gaze into the stunning waterfall as it cascades from the rocks and brave the terrifying sky walk to wander among the clouds.

Charlestown Harbour near St Austell

Charlestown harbour

The charming fishing port of Charlestown dates back to the late 1700s and was used throughout the 19th and 20th Century to export China Clay from Cornwall's many 'white gold' mines to ports around the world. Today the harbour is popular with tourists, and has been featured in many films and iconic television dramas, most recently BBC's Poldark. As well as the historic cottages and harbour, Charlestown also houses a small fleet of tall ships, some of which open their gang planks to the public each year for a peek inside. There are also a couple of beaches, plus plenty of excellent places to eat out, indulge in a Cornish ice-cream, or watch the world go by over a traditional Cornish cream tea.

Mevagissey harbour

Mevagissey fishing village

With a fleet of colourful local fishing boats bobbing up and down in the harbour, Mevagissey is a charming little village with plenty of quirky shops, wonderful restaurants and mouth-watering ice-cream parlours to keep the whole family entertained.

The narrow streets are bursting with history, with many of the smal fisherman's cottages dating back to the 1800s. There are also daily fishing trips to other nearby ports including Fowey.

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